18th Annual -

Fire Protection & Life Safety Forum

 

                            

 

Fire Code Expo & Fire Protection Technology Exhibitionn
Code Updates,
Latest Trents in Fire Protection Technology, and Continuing Education

Understanding Fundamentals of Community Risk Reduction

 

  Firefighter Safety Symposium
 Firefighter and Chief Officer Training & Continuing Education
  

Campus Fire Safety & EmergencyManagement

Professional Development Series

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February 28th and March 1st - 2022 

 

Hyatt Regency - Columbus, Ohio   

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Program Schedule,

Workshop Information, and Conference Lunch Menues

 

January 17, 2022 - We have mande some scheduling adjustments, please note the changes.

 

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     Sunday February 27, 2022

 

 8:00pm - 9:00pm 

 Hotel PDR Room (Private Dining Room located to the 2nd floor next to the resturant)

 Early Arrival Conference Registration and Hospitality

 

 6:30pm - 12:00am

 Franklin Lobby

 Exhibitor Set-up

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     Monday February 28, 2022

 

 8:00am - 11:20am

 Franklin Rooms A, B, C, & D 

 Conference Open and Keynote Session

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 11:20am - 12:00pm

  Franklin Lobby / Exhibit area

  One-On-One with our Technology Experts and Exhibitors

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 12:00pm - 1:00pm

 McKinley & Hayes Meeting Rooms  (located on the first floor)

  Lunch

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 1:00pm - 2:00pm

 

  Franklin Room - A

 102. The Covid Ups and Downs of Fire Safety During Construction 

 

 Franklin Room - B

 116. Code Compliance and Safety in Cannabis Extraction Facilities
 
 Franklin Room - C
 

206. NFPA 13/13R/13D - Comparing and Contrasting

 

 Franklin Room - D

 210. All Things "FDC"- The Fire Department Connection

 

 Fairfield Room - Firefighter Safety Symposium

 302. Tribulation, Tragedy, and Triumph: A Close Call, A Double Line-of-Duty Death and Lessons Learned

   

 Taft Room - Campus Fire Department Symposium

 

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 2:15pm - 3:15pm

 

  Franklin Room - A
 104. Outdoor Events and the International Building and Fire Codes

 

 Franklin Room - B
 106. Engine Company Inspections – an overview based on the 2018 IFC


 Franklin Room - C

 209. Fire Sprinkler Obstruction Rules in NFPA 13

 

 Franklin Room - D 

203.Emergency Responder Radio Systems - Understanding ERCES/Bi-Directional amplifier (BDA)  Systems enforcement & Specifying for AHJS, Architects& Engineers

 

 Fairfield Room - Firefighter Safety Symposium

  307. Fire Service Response to Automated Warehouse Storage Facilities

 

 Taft Room - Campus Fire Department Symposium

 

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 3:15pm - 3:45pm

 

 Franklin Lobby / Exhibit area

 

  Afternoon Break with Exhibitors

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 3:45pm - 4:45pm

 

  Franklin Room - A
 111. The benefits of Combining Fire Code and Zoning Code Enforcement

 

 Franklin Room - B
 115. Municipal Fire Department and Private Sector Partnerships in Safety


 Franklin Room - C
 

211. Introduction to Fire Alarm Systems [NFPA 72]

 

 Fairfield Room - Firefighter Safety Symposium

  306. Energy Storage System (ESS) Explosion in Arizona - Incident Review

  

 Taft Room - Campus Fire Department Symposium

  

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     Tuesday March 1, 2022

 

 

 8:00am - 9:00am

 

   Franklin Room - B
 201. Emergency Radio Communication Enhancement Systems to support reliable emergency first responder radio coverage in commercial buildings.


 Franklin Room - C

 208. The US EPA AIM Act, Alternatives to Fire Protection HFC’s & NFPA 2001 Clean Extinguishing Agents

 

 Franklin Room - D

  117. The Fire Suppression Rating Schedule-Community Risk Reduction

 

 Taft Room - Campus Fire Department Symposium

 

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 9:00am - 9:30am

 

 Franklin Lobby / Exhibit area

  Mid-Morning Break with Exhibitors

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 9:30am - 10:30am

 

 Franklin Room - A
 114. Construction Fire Safety Best Practices 

 

Franklin Room - B
 105. Codes, Standards and Technologies of NFPA 96 2021


 Franklin Room - C
   

207. Standpipes - Designed and Installed for the AHJ

 

 Franklin Room - D  

212. What Codes Apply to Fire Alarm Systems

 

 Fairfield Room - Firefighter Safety Symposium

 303. What is Killing Firefighters? Preventing Future Fatalities by Learning from the Past

   

 Taft Room - Campus Fire Department Symposium

 

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 10:45am - 11:45am

 

  Franklin Room - A
 108. Fire Alarm Fatigue

 

 Franklin Room - B
 112. Mobile Food Trucks and NFPA 96


 Franklin Room - C
 

204. Myth Busters: Fire Protection Edition, Part 2

 

 Franklin Room - D 

 202. What Can You Do with Your Legacy Fire Alarm Systems – A Fresh Approach to Upgrades that Doesn’t Break the Bank 

 

 Fairfield Room - Firefighter Safety Symposium

 301. Fire Operations in Multi-Story and Large-Area Structures

   

 Taft Room - Campus Fire Department Symposium

 

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 12:00pm - 1:00pm

 

 Hayes Meeting Room   (located on the first floor)

 

  Lunch

 

 Mckinley Meeting Room  (located on the first floor)

  (Sponsored by Fire Code Academy)

 

  Ohio Fire Officials Meeting and Lunch

 

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 1:00pm - 2:00pm

 

  Franklin Room - A 

 113. Wood Construction & the Fire Investigator 

 

 Franklin Room - B
 109. Haunted Attractions and Escape Rooms Should Scare You


 Franklin Room - C
 

205. Fire Alarm Design by the Numbers

 

 Franklin Room - D

  107. Hazardous Material Requirements of the Building & Fire Codes

 

 Fairfield Room - Firefighter Safety Symposium

 305. Post Fire Scene Health Hazards

 

 Taft Room - Campus Fire Department Symposium

   

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 2:15pm - 3:15pm

 

  Franklin Room - A
 118. 2-Way Emergency Communication for Assisted Rescue and designated Areas of Rescue and UL2525

 

 Franklin Room - B
 103. [NFPA 80] Saving Time Saves Lives: Streamlining Fire Door Inspection


 Franklin Room - C

 110. Navigating The Product Certification Maze

 

 Franklin Room - D

  101 Protecting Your Equipment from Fire is Protecting Your Facility from Fire

 

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     Workshop and Program Descriptions

 

 

 

This logo in the program description of [200 Series Programs] indicates this lecture has been approved by the Ohio Board of Building Standards (OBBS) for continuing education credit for building officials, fire protection inspectors, building inspectors and those who receive a separate certification from (OBBS).

 

Section Explanations -

100 Series Program Track - Community Risk Reduction Series: Fire Prevention/Code Enforcement/Campus Fire Safety

200 Series Program Track - Fire Protection Technology and Codes

300 Series Program Track - Firefighter Health and Safety 

 

     100 Series Programs - Community Risk Reduction and Related Programs    

  

101 Protecting Your Equipment from Fire is Protecting Your Facility from Fire
Presented By: FireTrace INternational


Industrial settings often present a multitude of fire risks that often go unnoticed, that is until it is too late. Those responsible for assessing fire risks and looking for ways to mitigate them often have a difficult choice to make when selecting an approach to fire safety. These decision makers find themselves stuck in the intersection of a lack of mandate and an abundance of options, amongst which doing nothing is absolutely on the table.

What if I told you that choosing to protect the equipment inside your facility was not only a way to protect lives, but livelihoods as well? Many industrial facilities, especially older facilities that have incorporated additions over time, contain areas that are not protected by sprinkler systems. Equipment fires in these areas can and do spread to the structure of the building itself, potentially causing harm to personnel or making the structure of the building unsafe for firefighters to enter. Now, think about businesses in close enough proximity to others where a fire in one facility means a fire in several.

 

Learning Objective 1: Identify which types of equipment pose fire risk
Learning Objective 2: Understand the connection between equipment fires and facility fires
Learning Objective 3: Understand the options for addressing fire hazards in industrial facilities

 

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102. The Covid Ups and Downs of Fire Safety During Construction
Presented By: Cambridge MA Fire Department/International Association of Fire Fighters


This presentation will discuss the history and lessons learned over the last two years, of various perspectives from two different subject matter followers, as we continue to grow from the aftermath of this pandemic. As the nation recovers, it is important that varying safeguards do not become shadowed or non-existing while buildings undergo things such as rebuilding or repurposing as it strives to adjust for the people’s needs.


Learning Objective 1:  We will demonstrate how the sudden need for shuttering construction sites brought brand new challenges and expectations as they were left vulnerable for a different reason.
Learning Objective 2: We will show how other regulations and best practices came into play that were not covered in the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) document 241 or the International Fire Code (IFC) Chapter 33.
Learning Objective 3: We will cover the future publications of NFPA 241 and IFC Chapter 33 along with the direction they are heading in.

 

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103. Saving Time Saves Lives: Streamlining Fire Door Inspection [NFPA 80]

Presented By: Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky Regional Council of Carpenters


NFPA 80 requires that all fire door assemblies are inspected and documented annually by a qualified person.


Who is responsible for the inspection and is it being done correctly? Are you confident that the inspector is knowledgeable in fire door assemblies?

 
In this presentation we will discuss the Top 10 infractions most commonly found on fire door assemblies and other topics with a trained and certified instructor specializing in door safety.

 

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104. Outdoor Events and the International Building and Fire Codes
Presented By: George Mason University

 

Outdoor assembly events are one of the hottest productions for event planners and artists to host across the country. Their popularity has increased during COVID due to the outdoor nature and the lower risk of COVID transmission while so many people are trying to get back to “normal” in a post-pandemic society.

  

For years the ICC codes have regulated parts of outdoor events including stages, grandstands, tents, and other structures. However, there are many more risks that are present at outdoor events that haven’t been addressed until the 2018 ICC codes were adopted.

  

This presentation will review the changes to the 2018 ICC codes regulating outdoor assembly events and how they work well and also fall short of reducing risk at events of events. We will also discuss how the vagueness of this section places additional pressures on Institutions of Higher Education (IHE) and Fire Code Officials who have IHE’s in their jurisdictions. Attendees will be able to leave with some tools developed by George Mason University to address those pressures, and allow for events to be safely produced in outdoor settings

 

Learning Objective 1: Discuss types of outdoor events and their associated risks.
Learning Objective 2: Identify the shortcoming of current Codes and the uncertain landscape that creates.
Learning Objective 3: How to build a successful partnership with event producers and the Fire Code Official.

  

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105. Codes, Standards and Technologies of NFPA 96 2021

Presented By: Derby Services, Commercial Kitchen Service and Cleaning

As we move forward from the shutdowns and limitations due to COVID-19, many of us are likely looking forward to the day when our favorite restaurant will be able to run at full capacity. As we look forward to those days, this presentation offers an introduction to some of the basic concepts (NFPA 96) that are used for the protection of customers, employees, and the building itself.


NFPA 96 is a set of codes and standards for ventilation control and fire protection of commercial cooking operations by the National Fire Protection Association. These are the standards that fire marshals follow and commercial cooking operations are required to adhere to

Learning Objective 1: Provide a better understanding of emerging technology and exhaust systems installed in today’s modern kitchens.
Learning Objective 2: Emphasis on the ANSI/IKECA standard Trio C-10, M-10,I-10.
Learning Objective 2: Provide a better understanding of the revision of NFPA 96 2021.

 

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106. Engine Company Inspections – an overview based on the 2018 IFC
Presented By: Meridian Fire Department, Idaho


This program is designed for engine company level education on engine company level inspections based the 2018 IFC. As most codes are similar, It can be adjusted for any code adopted. The concepts are the same. This program was created for departments that don’t have dedicated inspectors and rely on engine companies or other personnel to conduct inspections. This presentation covers inspection basics for any Business (B), Mercantile (M) and most Assembly (A) level occupancies.

Using a systematic approach to doing inspections, much like fire investigations, any code official or engine company member, can be successful in doing basic level inspections. In my presentation, I cover the walk around, walking through the building, and working with the property owner/manager on fire code issues. Some of the items covered: Exiting, Emergency lighting, door locks, secondary locking devices, fire doors, electrical systems, extension cords, surge protectors, fire extinguishers, hood systems, open flames, storage and fire department access to name a few.

Learning Objective 1: Anyone on an engine company can be a successful inspector.
Learning Objective 2: Basic reminders of most found fire code violations in traditional occupancies.
Learning Objective 3: How to work with the owners and managers in getting them into compliance if code violations are found.

 

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107. Hazardous Material Requirements of the Building & Fire Codes
Presented By: TERP Consulting


This presentation will address the requirements for classification of hazardous materials under the International Building Code, International Fire Code, and NFPA Standards. Topics to be covered include classification difference between Department of Transportation (DOT) and model building/fire code classifications. It will address the process for determinization of allowable quantities within a building or property and requirements for the Hazardous Material Inventory Statement (HMIS). It also addresses the requirements necessary for code compliant storage and use of hazardous materials. Topics to be covered include use-open versus use-closed, spill control/containment, ventilation, separation distances, and other specific hazardous Group H Occupancy requirements.

Learning Objective 1: HazMat hazard classification in accordance with model codes.
Learning Objective 2: Maximum Allowable Quantity (MAQ) of HazMat allowed and requirements necessary when amount is exceeded.
Learning Objective 3: Plan review & design requirements for HazMat storage.

 

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108. Fire Alarm Fatigue
Presented By: Fire Protection and Paramedicine Sciences, Eastern Kentucky University


Throughout time buildings have become more equipped with alarm and notification systems. Which has indeed seen benefits to evacuating individuals in the case of fire. However, with an increase in alarm system comes the increase of unwanted alarms. Currently, codes and standards do not state how many unwanted alarms are too many. However, it is possible that too many unwanted alarms will create what is called “fire alarm fatigue”. Fire alarm fatigue has been referenced in some historical Higher Education accommodations such as Seton Hall in 2000 and The Cube in 2019, where student had experience repeated unwanted alarms and started to ignore fire alarms.

This presentation will outline the background research on alarm fatigue in general and how it fits in to the fire protection field. Next, the presentation will show pilot data of two comparable residence halls that have to different frequencies of unwanted fire alarm. This presentation will conclude with future needs in order to complete this research.

Learning Objective 1: Understand the background research of alarm fatigue
Learning Objective 2: Understand where alarm fatigue fits in to the fire protection field
Learning Objective 3: Understand the needs of this type of research in order to better understand fire alarm fatigue in residential occupancies including University residence halls.


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109. Haunted Attractions and Escape Rooms Should Scare You
Presented By: Canfield Fire, Ohio


Halloween has become a $10 billion- dollar-a-year industry and is second only to the Christmas holiday. From mazes and hayrides to temporary haunts, permanent haunts, charity and home haunted attractions, there are well over 5000 haunted attractions in the US. With the addition of “escape rooms” that number has climbed to 7500 attractions. Haunted attractions lead customers into a labyrinth of mazes with lights, sounds and low visibility that, if not properly inspected, could lead to a tragedy. In this class, we will review the applicable fire codes that regulate haunted attractions and escape rooms; tips on conducting the inspections; and the requirements needed to open one. This class will not only give you the perspective of the fire inspector, but also that of a haunted attraction builder and manager.

Some of the information we will cover in this lecture:
1. Haunted Attraction Statistics
2. Pre-Inspection
3. Fire & Life Safety
4. Lighting
5. Decorations and Props
6. Escape Rooms and Room Inspections
7. Electrical
8. Emergency Procedures

 

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110. Navigating The Product Certification Maze
Presented By: Fire Code Academy


Certification marks are issued by accredited third-party testing & certification agencies and found on a wide variety of products installed in residential, industrial and commercial buildings, including electric and gas-fired appliances/HVAC equipment, Fire Protection, lighting, plumbing, etc. Building codes rely on the use of tested & certified products and equipment that meets safety and performance standards and, while most jurisdictions require that certification marks appear on products, some confusion remains about what these marks mean and who is qualified to perform the testing and issue the marks.

 

This one-hour presentation guides the participant through the testing & certification process, and highlights the roles and responsibilities that product manufacturers, standards development organizations, third-party testing & certification agencies and Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) all share in ensuring that products and equipment installed in buildings will not endanger public safety and health.

 

The presentation also addresses the importance of combating counterfeit products in the global marketplace and provides practical tips on identifying such products which could place consumers at risk of serious injury, illness or death.

 

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111. The benefits of Combining Fire Code and Zoning Code Enforcement
Presented By: Springfield Township Fire Department, Ohio


This presentation has been presented four times; we are preparing to share with other municipalities to discuss the effects of combining different inspection divisions into one. We have had many success stories with this along with the occasional set back other municipalities may encounter as well. We will discuss how we worked through those, and answer questions others may have pertaining to their municipality.

Combining enforcement divisions was a new innovative way we found to provide better services to our residents and business owners while reducing cost. We understand this is an "outside of the box" concept that may or may not benefit other communities. Buy in or collaboration of internal departments from their own municipality is crucial and another topic we will discuss.

In 2017, the Springfield Township Fire Department launched a Code Enforcement Division to provide inspection services for zoning and property maintenance as well as fire inspection for business, schools and daycare facilities. With the addition of the Code Enforcement Division, the Department improved its Insurance Service Office (ISO) Class rating from a Class 3 to a Class 2. ISO class ratings can have a significant influence on property insurance rates, especially for businesses. This exceptional rating has been achieved by less than 3% of fire departments nationwide.

This presentation will discuss the success of the program since 2017. We also will discuss how we utilize the court system and other county agencies to mitigate dangerous properties, properties after a fire incident, zoning and nuisance cases. The presentation will also show how collaboration within our own township departments is slowing blight and dealing with issues involving liquor establishments.

Learning Objective 1: How combining the two enforcement divisions into one benefited Springfield Township.
Learning Objective 2: Will this work for your municipality and what to expect from combining divisions.
Learning Objective 3: What we learned from our experience with trying different innovative ideas.

 

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112. Mobile Food Trucks and NFPA 96
Presented By: Precison Kleen, Inc, Mobile Food Trucks


Now that mobile food truck and temporary cooking operations are included in the NFPA 96 2021 Edition. We will provide the code chapters 11&17. Overview and Basic identification of related Codes and Fire Hazards within food trucks.

Learning Objective 1: Have a better understanding of the new established codes in NFPA 96 2021 Edition as it applies to the construction, installation and operation of mobile food trucks.
Learning Objective 2: Identify potential hazards with food trucks and these requirements.
Learning Objective 3: Provide inspection techniques for exhaust systems, cooking appliances and fuel systems.

 

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113. Wood Construction & the Fire Investigator
Presented By: American Wood Council


This course is designed for Fire/ Arson Investigators to better know the principals of wood construction and how a thorough knowledge of wood construction can benefit an investigation. It will review key sections of NFPA 921. The program will highlight provisions of the International Residential Code to call attention to possible code violations that could possibly cause unusual or rapid-fire spread and failure of an assembly. The course concludes with a case study.


Learning Objective 1: Review the scientific method as a “systematic approach” to fire investigation and why a knowledge of building construction is required.
Learning Objective 2: Identify the 5 types of building construction and wood construction methods. Focus on various wood construction methods.
Learning Objective 3: Discuss specific code requirements and how failure to meet the code can result in rapid fire spread or failure.

 

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114. Construction Fire Safety Best Practices
Presented By: American Wood Council


This Course introduces inspectors to the codes that safeguard buildings undergoing construction, major renovation and demolition. The course discusses best practices regarding hot work, housekeeping, storage, and site security. Students will learn the requirement and responsibilities of the construction site fire prevention program manager and the components of a well-crafted construction site pre-fire plan. They will preview the construction fire safety code changes coming in the 2021 edition of the International Fire Code.


Learning Objective 1: Identify risks & hazards on constructions sites. Learn the leading causes of fires in structures under construction.
Learning Objective 2: Apply model codes and standards that pertain to safety precautions during construction.
Learning Objective 3: Identify best practices regarding housekeeping, equipment, flammable and combustible materials, and other hazardous activities on construction sites.

 

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115. Municipal Fire Department and Private Sector Partnerships in Safety
Presented By: Emergency24 Inc.


We have delivered a unique solution for automatic, electronic dispatching and managing less-urgent alarm signals that has enabled multiple municipalities in the Chicago area to reduce truck deployment, streamline and focus call-taker actions and provide a faster dispatching process for commercial properties. Emergency24 partnered with Keltron Corporation and their network and LS 7000 Alarm Management System along with Elgin, IL – based Fox Valley Fire and multiple fire agencies to develop and implement this technological solution. The team will present the results and demonstrate the capability that other fire departments can deploy including immediate texts to battalion chiefs and selected leadership; automatic, electronic dispatch with back-up phone call dispatch if not acknowledged; and live up-to-date reports of commercial properties in disregard status. The results include a reduction in non-critical calls to PSAP call takers and improved and more readily available information to first responders.

Learning Objective 1: Learn about a partnership that improved community safety and mitigated fire fighter risks
Learning Objective 2: Learn about an enhanced communication solution between a central station and PSAP
Learning Objective 3: Learn how advanced and regular real-time reporting improved agency awareness of commercial properties’ alarm statuses

 

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116. Code Compliance and Safety in Cannabis Extraction Facilities
Presented By: TLB Fire Protection Engineering.


Proper application of codes and standards continues to challenge municipalities and facility designers/owners as the cannabis extraction industry emerges from underground and illegal operations to full-scale and fully permitted chemical processing facilities. This high-level training seminar will highlight the application of the 2018 Edition of the International Fire Code and Building Code, along with the NFPA 1 Fire Code and other referenced codes and standards in the rapidly growing and evolving cannabis extraction industry.


Topics will include code compliance and industrial safety best practices in facility design, construction, and operational procedures, as well as how to conduct fire and building inspections.
The training covers the new IFC Chapter 39 and NFPA 1 Chapter 38 requirements for design and construction of extraction facilities, use of prefabricated "extraction booths," safe long term manufacturing operations, equipment reviews and reports, facility technical reports, and the challenges faced when developing local municipal ordinances.


The specific hazards of hydrocarbon (LP-gas), flammable liquid, and carbon dioxide extraction will be discussed, with additional review and concepts of post-extraction hazards, compliant gas detection, mechanical ventilation, electrical classification, and proper integration into facility fire protection systems such as fire sprinklers and fire alarms.

Learning Objective 1: Detail the common fire and life safety hazards associated with cannabis extraction and postproduction manufacturing operations.

Learning Objective 2: How to properly design these facilities, as well as how to conduct plan reviews in accordance with the ICC and NFPA family of Codes and Standards, for the hazardous materials processes of extraction and post-extraction operations.

Learning Objective 3: How to utilize the Codes and referenced Standards to conduct field inspections, properly analyze operational procedures, and to ensure safeguards for emergency responders.

 

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117. The Fire Suppression Rating Schedule-Community Risk Reduction
Presented By: (ISO) Insurance Services Office


In this lecture participants will learn about ISO’s Public Protection Classification (PPC) program, the system which ISO uses to review the fire protection capabilities of nearly 48,000 fire districts across the United States. The primary focus will be the community risk reduction (CRR) section including the major areas of fire prevention, public fire safety education, and fire investigation. This section, which is community extra credit, is an important area for overall community scoring and the resulting insurance rating/premium calculation.

   

Attendees will be introduced to the information that will be needed to complete the survey as well as pre-survey documents utilized by the PPC field staff. Ample time will be available to discuss, in detail, the process so as to make the participants more comfortable with a PPC field visit. The overall PPC survey, as it relates to the fire suppression rating schedule (FSRS) will also be discussed.

Learning Objective 1: Participants will understand application of credit for the fire prevention section of the FSRS.
Learning Objective 2: Participants will discuss the impact of, and what makes an effective, public safety education program.
Learning Objective 3: Participants will discuss effective and alternative methods to reach the public through educational programs.

 

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118. 2-Way Emergency Communication for Assisted Rescue and designated Areas of Rescue and UL2525

Presented By: Space Age Electronics

 

On July 26, 1990 the Americans with Disabilities Act (also known as the ADA) was signed into U.S. Federal law, and it includes a requirement for Area of Refuge communication system(s). In an Emergency, stairways become the primary means of exit, making building egress for those with mobility issues a difficult task putting their safety and the safety of others at risk. The ADA requires 2-way voice communications at each “Area of Refuge” (a.k.a. Area of Rescue Assistance), and proper signage to guide people to those designated areas. An Area of Refuge system is required in any new Commercial Building with more than one floor (above or below the main floor).
 

Topics discussed in this presentation include:
• What is 2 Way Communication for Assisted Rescue?
• Navigating the code and Standard?
• What constitutes an Area of Rescue?
• How does the UL2525 apply to the 2 Way Emergency Communication System?
• How the upcoming code cycles will embrace 2 Way Communication Systems.
• How to test and inspect these systems.

 

 

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     200 Series Programs - Fire Protection Systems

     Code Requirements, Inspection & Testing, Design and Technology

 

This logo in the program description of [200 Series Programs] indicates this lecture has been approved by the Ohio Board of Building Standards (OBBS) for continuing education credit for building officials, fire protection inspectors, building inspectors and those who receive a separate certification from (OBBS).

 

 

201. Emergency Radio Communication Enhancement Systems to support reliable emergency first responder radio coverage in commercial buildings.
Presented By: ADT Security Services


Reliable emergency radio coverage for first responders can be compromised in high-rise towers, single story schools, hospitals, municipal offices, and transportation hubs prompting new International Building Code (IBC) requirements and updated NFPA codes to address the issue. As local jurisdictions begin implementing and enforcing new codes mandating building enhancements to boost emergency radio signal strength, this presentation provides a wholistic overview of the technologies, code requirements and types of systems available along with best practices for design, testing, commissioning, and implementation of ERCES systems. Using clear, concise explanations highlighted with descriptive illustrations, this important and timely presentation offers information on the elements that make up a complete ERCES system including Bi-Directional Amplifier (BDA), Distributed Antenna System (DAS) types and components, when and where ERCES is required and who is responsible for installations in commercial buildings. Also included is detail on FCC requirements and public safety radio bands (VHF and UHF).

Learning Objective 1: Gain knowledge of new and forthcoming safety code requirements for commercial buildings when construction size, type or materials adversely affect the reliable operation of first responder radio systems during emergency situations at schools, hospitals, municipal offices, or any commercial location.
Learning Objective 2: Obtain a clear and wholistic understanding of how Emergency Radio Communication Enhancement Systems work to address this potential communications issue including technical aspects, where a solution is required and who is responsible for complying with code requirements.
Learning Objective 3: Identify what to look for in a qualified technology partner to evaluate the most appropriate system and configuration for your specific geographic area who also possess the necessary certifications and qualifications to provide installation, project management and service on fire and life safety systems.


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202. What Can You Do with Your Legacy Fire Alarm Systems – A Fresh Approach to Upgrades that Doesn’t Break the Bank
Presented By: Keltron Corporation

Do you have multiple brands and models of fire alarm systems throughout your campus? Do you want all of your buildings’ fire alarm systems to be connected in a single system but you cannot make that happen? This session will address the good, the bad and the ugly of this problem. What do the NFPA codes say about this situation? What can you do to resolve this situation without having to rip out everything and get all the same fire alarm systems?


Learning Objective 1: How to manage a facility with multiple brands and models of fire alarm systems
Learning Objective 2: What the NFPA codes say about connecting disparate systems together
Learning Objective 3: Signaling communication technologies that can connect a variety of systems together

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203.Emergency Responder Radio Systems - Understanding ERCES/Bi-Directional amplifier (BDA) Systems enforcement & Specifying for AHJS, Architects& Engineers
Presented By: Honeywell Fire Systems

Emergency Responder Communication Enhancement Systems (ERCES) were first introduced in the 2009 International Building Code. The ERCES requirement was established to address the performance of emergency responders’ portable radios inside buildings because building construction, building size, construction features, and other elements can absorb or block radio communications.

 
Most Fire and Building Codes across the county today (including the International Fire Code and The International Building Code) require all buildings to have an approved level of emergency communication coverage for emergency responders within the building based on the existing coverage levels of the public safety communication systems of the jurisdiction at the exterior of the building. This can be achieved by enhancing the in-building radio frequency signal coverage with an ERCES which comprises of a BDA / Signal Booster and Distributed Antenna System (DAS).
 
The Two Big Learning Objectives We Wil Discuss:
I) Code Requirements and Product Standards
II) Solving the Coverage Problem

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204. Myth Busters: Fire Protection Edition, Part 2
Presented By: Fire Code Academy


The 2020 conference featured a “Myth Busters: Fire Protection Edition” that explained and
busted the myths surrounding common fire protection issues. This 2022 program expands on these topics and tackles some other myths and misconceptions surrounding fire protection issues. For example, what does it mean to “void a UL listing? Does the ADA require the installation of fire alarm strobes? The codes are all based on technically substantiated science. Come and learn of some of these fire protection myths and misconceptions and see them busted so you can more effectively understand and apply fire and life codes and standards.

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205. Fire Alarm Design by the Numbers
Presented By: FIre Code Academy

Whether you are a designer, a building owner, or a code enforcement official, you have
probably always wondered about how to quantify the expected performance of a fire alarm
system. Common questions include: “How fast will the fire detection system detect a fire?”;
“What size will a fire be when the fire detection system activates?”; “How soon do we need to detect a fire to limit the potential damage to loss of no more than XX-lbs of stock?”; and “How
can a fire alarm system be code compliant if it doesn’t provide a sound pressure level (SPL) at
least 15-dBA above the average ambient SPL?”

  

These are just a few of the questions answered by the “numbers” behind a fire alarm system design. This presentation introduces some of the common calculations used in developing a fire detection and alarm system design or evaluating the expected performance of an existing fire detection and alarm system. Understanding these fundamental calculation methods and mathematical modeling provides a better understanding of the appropriate application and use of fire detection and alarm systems.

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206. NFPA 13/13R/13D - Comparing and Contrasting

Presented By: American Fire Sprinkler Association

Join us for a presentation to learn about the differences between NFPA 13, NFPA 13R, and NFPA 13D. This presentation will discuss the scope, application, and differences between the three sprinkler installation standards. Contractors, AHJs, and other users commonly misunderstand the scope and the goals of each standard.

Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this webinar, attendees will be able to:
Learning Objective 1: Locate the scope of each standard and apply the appropriate standard to a project.
Learning Objective 2: Compare and contrast the allowable installation materials for each standard.
Learning Objective 3: Compare and contrast the allowable sprinkler omissions for each standard.
Learning Objective 4: Apply the appropriate acceptance testing requirement, based on the applicable installation standard.

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207. Standpipes - Designed and Installed for the AHJ
Presented By: American Fire Sprinkler Association

Description: NFPA 14 Standard for the Installation of Standpipes and Hose Systems is one of the few installation standards that is operationally used by the AHJ. The 2023 edition of NFPA 14 is currently in the second draft stage and a substantial effort was made to focus on the needs of the AHJ when it comes to specific design requirements in the standard. This presentation will discuss the new structure of NFPA 14, additional installation requirements for scissor stairs and other special arrangements, and the evaluation of pumping capabilities of the fire department and the effect on the design and pressure limitation on a standpipe system.

Learning Objective 1: Locate and identify the requirements in the reorganized edition of NFPA 14.
Learning Objective 2: Determine when redundant installation features are required based on fire department pumping capabilities
Learning Objective 3: Identify and apply the requirements for vertical standpipe system zones
Learning Objective 4: Identify the required locations for hose connections
Learning Objective 5: Identify and apply all instances where the AHJ has the authority to enforce local requirements in NFPA 14

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208. The US EPA AIM Act, Alternatives to Fire Protection HFC’s & NFPA 2001 Clean Extinguishing Agents
Presented By: 3M Electronics Materials Solutions Division

Anyone involved in mission critical fire protection will experience the effects of US regulatory changes impacting HFC’s used as clean extinguishing agents. Protection of modern technology, particularly in electronics and energy require extinguishing media that itself does not cause collateral damage and is safe for normally occupied areas. The impacts from climate change from man-made materials are well documented and persist for 30-60 years as potent greenhouse gases, thousands of times more potent than CO2. The US Congress passed the AIM Act that now begins an aggressive movement that will phased down HFC’s including those used in fire protection.


Learning Objective 1: Understand the US AIM Act and its impact on fire protection including other Federal regulations focused on HFC’s in the United States and what that means to our industry.
Learning Objective 2: Review the evolution of Clean Agents used in Fire Protection and how NFPA Standards have likewise evolved around these regulations.
Learning Objective 3: Identify and compare the safety, environmental and fire performance criteria between HFC’s to other Clean Extinguishing Agents alternatives covered under NFPA 2001.
Learning Objective 4: Is there a future for clean fire extinguishing agents? Understand why clean agents are used and learn to differentiate between in-kind and not-in kind alternatives.

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209. Fire Sprinkler Obstruction Rules in NFPA 13
Presented By: National Fire Sprinkler Association (NFSA)

Spray sprinklers are the oldest type of sprinkler in use today and still the most versatile. NFPA 13 contains general obstruction requirements for all sprinklers as well as specific requirements for each specific sprinkler type.

Different obstruction rules vary with the characteristics of the obstruction. Light fixtures, structural members, shadow areas may or may not be considered obstructions to sprinkler discharge.

This seminar will explore the rules governing clearance to standard spray and extended coverage spray sprinklers.

Students are encouraged to bring a copy of NFPA 13 (2016 Edition) to class.

At the conclusion of this seminar the participant will be able to:

Learning Objective 1: Identify the intent of obstruction rules.
Learning Objective 2: Identify the zones of sprinkler discharge as they apply to obstruction rules.
Learning Objective 3: Apply the “beam rule”, “3-times rule”, “partition rule” and “wide obstruction rule”.
Learning Objective 4: Identify key exceptions to the obstruction rules.

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210. All Things "FDC"- The Fire Department Connection
Presented By: National Fire Sprinkler Association (NFSA)


This presentation was developed to enhance the fire service understanding of fire department connections (FDC). From basic design requirements, signage, types, and locations, though a discussion of tactical considerations for use. The presentation aims to simplify provide fire service personnel with an overview of the fire department connection and open a discussion on proper use and limitations.


Learning Objective 1: This course will provide requirements found in NFPA 13 and NFPA 14 for fire department connections as it relates to location, signage, identification, and other install requirements
Learning Objective 2: We will examine the many types of FDC’s and their indications of system design.
Learning Objective 3: We will discuss the purpose of FDC’s - suppling, supplementing system demand or simply redundancy.
Learning Objective 4: Finally we will discuss the operational side of using fire department connection and their limitations in providing system demand.

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211. Introduction to Fire Alarm Systems [NFPA 72]

Presented By: Underwriters laboratories (UL)

 

Fire alarm systems has several devices working together to detect and warn people through visual and audio appliances when smoke, fire, carbon monoxide or other emergencies are present. These alarms may be activated automatically from smoke detectors, and heat detectors or may also be activated via manual fire alarm activation devices such as manual call points or pull stations.
Fire alarm systems are essential for the adequate detection and warning of a fire situation within commercial and residential premises.

 

The detection, visual and audible requirements of a fire alarm system are dependent on the layout and use of the building. It is due to the diversity of these applications that fire alarm panels and related accessories have been developed to meet these varying needs.

 

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212. What Codes Apply to Fire Alarm Systems

Presented By: Underwriters laboratories (UL)

 

When a fire alarm system is installed, tested and maintained, it must be done properly based upon various different codes and standards. Fire alarm system installation and annual testing is code driven. The International Code Council (Publishers of the Fire and Building Codes) along with NFPA 72 (National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code) updates these codes and standards on a three (3) year cycle.This presentation will provide basic code knowledge and updates to these installation and testing requirements.

 

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213. UL 2524 -ANSI/CAN/UL Standard for In-building 2-Way Emergency Radio Communication Enhancement Systems
Presented By: Underwriters laboratories (UL)

Emergency first responders use portable radios, known as land mobile radios or LMRs, as a critical communication tool to help ensure effective fireground command and control, to establish personnel accountability, and to improve firefighter safety when operating within buildings during a fire or other emergency. Emergency responder communication enhancement systems (ERCES) are required by model fire codes for new buildings; the design, installation, testing and maintenance are covered by NFPA 1221 and with the adoption of the 2021 International Fire Code (IFC) and NFPA 1 Fire Code, ERCES are required to be listed in accordance with UL 2524, the Standard for in-building emergency responder communication enhancement system

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     300 Series Programs - Firefighter Safety Symposium

     Firefighter Health, Wellness and Safety

 

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301. Fire Operations in Multi-Story and Large-Area Structures.
Presented By: City of Dayton Division of Fire

Does your fire companies really know the buildings in their first-due district? Various concepts of fire protection systems, some of which can be quite complicated or intimidating, and brought down "to the street" for firefighters and company officers. Significant knowledge of standpipe and sprinkler systems, fire pumps, elevators, fire alarm control panels, smoke control systems, and other building safety features is often reserved for fire prevention or code enforcement personnel. Students will gain an understanding of complex fire protection system components that will enable them to apply the easy-to-remember principles on working incidents. Attendees are also guided in developing a realistic and engaging company-level pre-incident planning program. Case studies involving line-of-duty deaths and high-dollar-loss fires that occurred in buildings despite fire protection systems being in place are also examined.

 

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302. Tribulation, Tragedy, and Triumph: A Close Call, A Double Line-of-Duty Death and Lessons Learned

Presented By: The Colerain Township Department of Fire and Emergency Medical Services, OH

 

 

Below-Grade/Basement residential fires present inherent dangers during firefighting operations. Numerous line-of-duty-deaths and near misses have occurred in the last two decades. The Colerain Township Department of Fire and Emergency Medical Services (Colerain Fire and EMS) experienced both a near miss in 2003 and a double line-of-duty-death in 2008 at below-grade/basement residential fires.

 

Following the tragic double line-of-duty-death incident in 2008, the Squirrelsnest Lane Line-of-Duty Death Fact Finding Committee conducted a comprehensive review of the incident and challenged the underlying norms, policies, and objectives in respect to firefighting operations.

  

The process of doing so produced 51 findings and 72 recommendations including the development of a Standard Operating Guideline (SOG) for Below-grade/Basement Fires. Henceforth, the Below-Grade/Basement Fire SOG has been successfully applied on numerous occasions with none more so apparent than at a residential structure fire in November 2016.

 

This structure fire presented itself with challenges and hidden dangers that had we not learned from the past it is possible another history repeating event with equally tragic consequences may have occurred. However, the successful application of the Below-Grade/Basement Fire SOG and the use of a transitional attack resulted in a successful fireground operation. Unequivocally speaking then, the development and use of a SOG for Below-grade/Basement Fires is paramount to safe and effective fireground operations.

 

Learning Objective 1: Below-Grade/Basement fires present inherent dangers during firefighting operations with numerous line-of-duty-deaths and near misses over the last two decades.
Learning Objective 2: Size up at below-grade/basement fires is critical to the success of the operation.
Learning Objective 3: The development and application of a Below-Grade/Basement Fire Standard Operating Guideline has resulted in safer fireground operations.

 

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303. What is Killing Firefighters? Preventing Future Fatalities by Learning from the Past

Presented By: Toledo Fire & Rescue (OH)

 

This program is directed at firefighters with 10 minutes on the job up to the silver-haired veterans. Focusing on the research of firefighter fatalities from 1998 through 2017, this session identifies how firefighters died as a result of traumatic fire ground deaths. Dr. Krause brings together his research of firefighter's last moments, describing in detail how they perished in service to their communities. Armed with the knowledge of how these men and women died, modifications to training programs, standard operating policies and procedures and fire ground leadership development can be implemented. Combining research and actual fire ground scenarios, attendees will be afforded the opportunity to learn first-hand what mistakes were made on numerous emergency scenes. This understanding will aid the firefighter, fire officer and fire chief to develop solutions to prevent similar tragedies in the future. Attendees will leave the session with nuggets of usable, digestible information they can immediately apply on their next emergency scene and within their respective fire departments.

 

Items Discussed:
1. Research based upon a study of 149 fatal fireground incidents, totaling 176 deaths, identifies seven broad categories in-which firefighters perished.
2.This session identifies those seven categories, breaks down the data, identifies common themes in each of the fatalities and provides realistic methods to aid in the prevention of similar tragedies in the future.
3. Understanding how firefighters have died in the past can inform, educate and prepare fire crews from repeating similar mistakes and suffering the same tragic result.

 

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304. Taking Action Against Cancer in the Fire Service

Presented By: Firefighter Cancer Support Network

  
Occupational cancer among firefighters is a growing concern. The Firefighter Cancer Support Network presents Taking Action Against Cancer in the Fire Service. This comprehensive program educates firefighters on the most current information on the risks of developing cancer; actions and behaviors that reduce or prevent exposure to hazards; encourages healthy lifestyle choices; and provides information about resources available to firefighter should they face cancer. Deliver through a 60 min presentation, students will gain a clear understanding of the current statistics on firefighter cancer, identifying the most common cancers affecting firefighters, the sources of occupational cancer and illness, actions and behaviors to reduce or prevent exposure, the importance of documentation of exposures, how critical early detection is to positive outcomes, and what they can do when faced with a diagnosis.
 
Learning Objective 1. Identity and discuss the causes of increased cancer risk to firefighters.  

Learning Objective 2. Identify and discuss the exposure risks and sources of occupational cancer and illness in the fire service.  

Learning Objective 3. Identifying and establishing risk mitigation and steps to lower the cancer risk to firefighters. 

 

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305. Post Fire Scene Health Hazards

Presented By: Pacific Pointe Consulting, Inc.

 

There is a popular misconception among many who work at a structural post-fire scene or who manage these workers that a cold scene, defined as one where the fire has been extinguished at least 72 hours, typically does not have any health hazards present that require the use of personal protective equipment or respiratory protection. Presented by a post-fire scene health and safety expert, this presentation aims to dispel this cold scene equals safe scene belief, which has been partly driven by a lack of research regarding this environment.

  

This presentation looks at the health hazards of the post-fire environment, recent research that is redefining the health hazards, and the precautions that need to be taken whenever someone is working in the post-fire environment. Those who could benefit from this information include public and private fire investigators and inspectors, insurance adjusters, remediation crews, attorneys, and anyone else who spends time in this environment.


Learning Objective 1. Have a better understanding of the health hazards from the post-fire environment
Learning Objective 2. Comprehend the research that is defining the health hazards
Learning Objective 3. Know the types of personal protective equipment, including respiratory protection, needed when working in this environment

 

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306. Energy Storage System (ESS) Explosion in Arizona - Incident Review

Presented By: Underwriters laboratories (UL)

 

After an explosion at an energy storage system (ESS) injured four firefighters in Surprise, Arizona, two new reports shed light on what happened as well as on some of the shortcomings of the safety systems, guidelines, and procedures in place to deal with ESS incidents. This program is a review of that incident and the lessons learned.

 

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307. Fire Service Response to Automated Warehouse Storage Facilities

Presented By: Underwriters laboratories (UL)

 

This is presentation is discussion of a project to develop a fire department response to an automated warehouse distribution system. These type of warehouses are showing up in all parts of the country. Many larger companies (like Amazon, etc..) are turning sights to these type of systems for managing and shipping their inventory.

 

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     Conference Lunch Menues
     ~ Bon Appétit!

 Monday

 

12:00p - 1:00p  Lunch ~ Soup, Salad & Sandwich…
Enjoy delicious potato cheese soup, Mixed Greens Salad or Italian pasta salad, build your own deli sandwich (Ham, Turkey, Roast Beef, Assorted Cheeses) & finish with a sweet dessert bar…. Coffee & Ice Tea

 

 

 Tuesday

 

12:00p - 1:00p  Lunch ~ Burgers and Chicken off the grill….
Angus burgers and grilled chicken breasts, assorte cheeses, chili, garlic potato wedges, whole kernel buttered corn and Cheese Cake…. Coffee & Ice Tea  

 

 

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Campus Fire Safety Com LLC and The Fire Code Academy
Life Safety Forum Conference Team
81 Mill Street - Suite 300

Gahanna, Ohio  43230 
 
Office: 614-416-8077

 

 

Copyright Campus Fire Safety Com LLC and The Fire Code Academy  © 2000-2021 all rights reserved.