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February 27 and 28 - 2023 

 

Hyatt Regency - Columbus, Ohio 

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Program Schedule,

Workshop/Breakout Session Information, and Conference Lunch Menues

 

This schedule is subject to change as we approve presentations and add new topics

 

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  Sunday February 26, 2023

 

 8:00pm - 9:00pm 

 Hotel PDR Room (Private Dining Room located on the 2nd floor next to the resturant)

 Early Arrival Conference Registration and Hospitality

 

 6:30pm - 12:00am

 Franklin Lobby

 Exhibitor Set-up

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  Monday February 27, 2023

 

 8:00am - 11:20am

 Franklin Rooms A, B, C, & D 

 Conference Open and Keynote Session

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 11:00am - 12:00pm

  Franklin Lobby / Exhibit area

  Golden Hour of Power!!!

  One-On-One with our Technology Experts and Exhibitors

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 12:00pm - 1:00pm

 McKinley & Hayes Meeting Rooms  (located on the first floor)

  Lunch

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 1:00pm - 2:00pm

 

 Franklin Room - A  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 012. Large Construction Site Fire Case Study. Is Your Jurisdiction Prepared?

 

 Franklin Room - B  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 032. Remote Inspections and Testing – How NFPA 915 Will Change the Way You See Things
  

Franklin Room - C  [Fire Protection Systems Series]

 001. Emergency Responder Communication Enhancement Systems (ERCES) and the UL Certification Program.

 
Franklin Room - D  [Fire Protection Systems Series]

035.  The 5 Specialty Sprinkler Types and (Sprinkler) Design Approaches

 

 Fairfield Room  [Potluck - Fire Codes, Investigation, Firefighter Safety, Etc..]

 003. Fire Works - An Overview on Consumer Grade Fireworks [Major Changes] & What you need to know!

 

 3rd Floor Executive Conference Room  [Campus Fire Department Symposium]

 This group will meet at pre-determined times throughout the conference as agreed upon by the
 participants. Please see conference administration if you would like to participate in this symposium.

 

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 2:15pm - 3:15pm

 

 Franklin Room - A  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 033. Modern Considerations for Responding Firefighters involving Storage Warehouse Fires and Installed Fire Protection and Life-Safety Systems

 

 Franklin Room - B  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 041. Commercial Cooking and Emerging Exhaust System Technology - Smoke Control


Franklin Room - C  [Fire Protection Systems Series]

 046. NFPA 72 – Chapter 14: Testing and Inspection [Can You Self-Perform Them]

  

Franklin Room - D  [Fire Protection Systems Series]

 030. Significant Changes to the 2022 Edition of the NFPA 72® National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code

 

 Fairfield Room  [Potluck - Fire Codes, Investigation, Firefighter Safety, Etc..]

 023. Tall Mass Timber Buildings (construction) & Fire Service Concerns

 

 3rd Floor Executive Conference Room  [Campus Fire Department Symposium]

 This group will meet at pre-determined times throughout the conference as agreed upon by the
 participants. Please see conference administration if you would like to participate in this symposium.

 

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 3:15pm - 3:45pm

 

 Franklin Lobby / Exhibit area

 Afternoon Break with Exhibitors

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 3:45pm - 4:45pm

 

 Franklin Room - A  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 005. Fire wall and Fire Door enforcement - Are We Doing Enough to Protect Our Community and Fire Service Responders?

 

 Franklin Room - B  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 044. Inspecting the Commercial Kitchen Exhaust - Water Wash Hood Systems and the Proper Inspection process
 

Franklin Room - C  [Fire Protection Systems Series]

 047. NFPA 72  – Chapter 26: Supervising Station Alarm Systems [Understanding the UL Monitoring Systems Certification Program]

 
Franklin Room - D  [Fire Protection Systems Series]

 017. Fundamentals of Fire Pump Plan Review

 

 Fairfield Room  [Potluck - Fire Codes, Investigation, Firefighter Safety, Etc..]

 022. Wooden I-joist Construction and Firefighter Safety

  

 3rd Floor Executive Conference Room  [Campus Fire Department Symposium]

 This group will meet at pre-determined times throughout the conference as agreed upon by the
 participants. Please see conference administration if you would like to participate in this symposium.

  

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  Tuesday February 28, 2023

 

 8:00am - 9:00am

  

 Franklin Room - A  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 004. Inclusive CRR [Community Risk Reduction] Programs for Campuses-Based or Multi-Building Environments: Communication, Coordination, Innovation
 

 Franklin Room - B  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 011. Does Fire Prevention and Community Risk Reduction Matter in Your Organization?
 

 Franklin Room - C  [Fire Protection Systems Series]

 034. Fire Sprinkler Considerations for Tall Clear Height Warehousing /ESFR Fire Sprinkler Protection in Warehouses

 
Franklin Room - D  [Fire Protection Systems Series]

 031. Past, Current and Future of the Fire Alarm Transmission Ecosystem

 

 Fairfield Room  [Potluck - Fire Codes, Investigation, Firefighter Safety, Etc..]

 026. Fire Service Concerns and Automated Parking Systems/Structures

 

 3rd Floor Executive Conference Room  [Campus Fire Department Symposium]

 This group will meet at pre-determined times throughout the conference as agreed upon by the
 participants. Please see conference administration if you would like to participate in this symposium.

 

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 9:00am - 9:30am

 

 Franklin Lobby / Exhibit area

 Mid-Morning Break with Exhibitors

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 9:30am - 10:30am

 

 Franklin Room - A  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 016. Datacenters - Is Your Data FIRE Safe?

 

 Franklin Room - B  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 037. Balancing Life Safety and Security While Maintaining a User-Friendly Facility
 

Franklin Room - C  [Fire Protection Systems Series]

 040. Leveraging New Technologies in the Fire and Life Safety Industry

 

Franklin Room - D  [Fire Protection Systems Series]

 007. Updates to NFPA 13, 2022  Edition: Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems

 

 Fairfield Room  [Potluck - Fire Codes, Investigation, Firefighter Safety, Etc..]

 024. Helping Your Fire Investigator: What NOT to do After a Fire

    

 3rd Floor Executive Conference Room  [Campus Fire Department Symposium]

 This group will meet at pre-determined times throughout the conference as agreed upon by the
 participants. Please see conference administration if you would like to participate in this symposium.

 

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 10:45am - 11:45am

 

 Franklin Room - A  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 025. Fire Codes "How Did We Get Here" 'Those Who Fail to Learn From History are Often Condemned to Repeat It!

 

 Franklin Room - B  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 036. Swinging Fire Doors: Assumptions, Myths, and Facts

 

Franklin Room - C  [Fire Protection Systems Series]

 048. Using Black and White Codes in a World of Grey

 

Franklin Room - D  [Fire Protection Systems Series]

 006. Enforcing NFPA 25: Deficiencies, Impairments, and Observations

 

 Fairfield Room  [Potluck - Fire Codes, Investigation, Firefighter Safety, Etc..]

 045 Understanding the Fire Investigation Process for Firefighters, Company Officers and Fire Inspectors.

    

 3rd Floor Executive Conference Room  [Campus Fire Department Symposium]

 This group will meet at pre-determined times throughout the conference as agreed upon by the
 participants. Please see conference administration if you would like to participate in this symposium.

 

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 12:00pm - 1:00pm

 

 Hayes Meeting Room   (located on the first floor)

  Lunch

 

 McKinley Meeting Room  (located on the first floor)

  Ohio Fire Officials Meeting and Lunch With the State Fire Marshal

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 1:00pm - 2:00pm

 

 Franklin Room - A  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 050. NFPA 80 & 105 - Code Requirements and Assessment for Meeting Inspection, Documentation, and Decommissioning Compliance of Fire & Smoke Doors and Dampers.

 

 Franklin Room - B  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 043. Special Amusement Buildings - Haunted Attractions and Escape Rooms Should Scare You
 

Franklin Room - C  [Fire Protection Systems Series]

 049. Myth Busters - 2023 Fire Protection Edition

 

Franklin Room - D  [Potluck - Fire Codes, Investigation, Firefighter Safety, Etc..]

 020. Understanding the Residential Mid-Rise Fire Problem from a Fire Protection and Code Enforcement Perspective.

 

 3rd Floor Executive Conference Room  [Campus Fire Department Symposium]

 This group will meet at pre-determined times throughout the conference as agreed upon by the
 participants. Please see conference administration if you would like to participate in this symposium.

   

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 2:15pm - 3:15pm

 

 Franklin Room - A  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 002. A Look into School / Educational Occupancy Entryways: Just How Safe Are They?

 

  Franklin Room - B  [Community Risk Reduction Series]

 018. “Hot Work Robot” - Portable Fire Watch System
  

Franklin Room - C  [Fire Protection Systems Series]

 014. Carbon Monoxide Alarm and Detection Requirements IBC/NFPA 720

  

 Franklin Room - D  [Potluck - Fire Codes, Investigation, Firefighter Safety, Etc..]

 042. The Compliance Engine - Brycer

 

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  Breakout Session Outlines and Program Descriptions

 

This logo in the program description indicates this lecture has an application for approval by the Ohio Board of Building Standards (OBBS) for continuing education credit for building officials, fire protection inspectors, building inspectors and those who receive a separate certification from the State of Ohio OBBS.

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001. Emergency Responder Communication Enhancement Systems (ERCES) and the UL Certification Program.
Presented by: UL Solutions

 

This program will provide an update on UL Solutions' latest certificate program on Emergency Responder Communication Enhancement Systems (ERCES)

 

The UL Solutions certification program forms a strong connection among the ERCES service providers, building owners, code authorities and UL Solutions. Certification provides confidence to all stakeholders that these systems comply with all of the elements found in the model codes, along with National Fire Protection Association NFPA 1221 or NFPA 1225 and International Fire Code IFC Section 510.

In-building emergency responder radio systems are an important life safety technology that provide emergency responders an effective and reliable means with which to communicate in environments that present interference and coverage concerns.

 

 
002. A Look into School / Educational Occupancy Entryways: Just How Safe Are They?
Presented by: Springfield Township Fire department (Ohio)


This presentation will discuss the differences between two recent schools, a new school and a renovated school. To show the new types of materials being used, samples of bullet proof drywall which were used will be passed around. There will be one virgin piece of drywall and a piece that has been shot with a firearm. We will discuss bullet proof glass versus Lexan covered glass and how the other school decided not to use those materials. Security doors both interior and exterior will be discussed and how it may affect fire alarms and access if the fire alarm is activated. The amount of glass in the newer schools has brought on newer challenges in relation to hiding and securing classrooms. We will also discuss the new open learning areas where even the hallways and entryways are being used as classrooms, how teaching has changed over the years as compared to traditional teaching and how this now impacts safety.

Learning Objectives:
1. Demonstrate the new building materials being used for entryways.
2. How the monetary budget affects safety between schools.
3. Is it possible to have a minimum requirement for security for schools?
 

 
003. Fire Works - An Overview on Consumer Grade Fireworks [Major Changes] & What you need to know!
Presented by: Phantom Fire Works


This presentation will cover most important elements about the 1.4G consumer fireworks industry. Including how and what consumer fireworks are made of, a look at the manufacturing process, how they are regulated by the many agencies and shipped in commerce for retail & wholesale distribution in the USA.

 
Attendees will get an inside look as well as a clearer understanding on how to better deal with consumer fireworks and novelties whether you are in the fire service, law enforcement special investigators or any other public safety position. This program is a must for all new, intermediate and veteran persons in all aspects of public safety and enforcement and is solely designed to better educate & partner with industry for a safer tomorrow.

 
Learning Objectives:
1. A much better understanding of consumer fireworks
2. To partner with industry for all the right reasons
3. To achieve the highest degree of safety, compliance and education to better serve & protect the public
 

 

004. Inclusive CRR [Community Risk Reduction] Programs for Campuses-Based or Multi-Building Environments: Communication, Coordination, Innovation

Presented by: California State University System

 
Campus Based or Multi-Building working environments are some of the most essential stakeholders of our communities and nearly every jurisdiction includes a college, hospital, or large commercial/industrial site. The unique hazards and needs of each campus type highlights the importance of customizing community risk reduction (CRR) efforts to protect the diverse populations served by these hubs of activity.
 
Co-created by the California State University System Offices of Fire Safety & Emergency Management/Continuity, this workshop will highlight effective strategies to facilitate CRR partnerships between public safety agencies and the diverse stakeholder groups integral to campus networks. Attendees will be guided through real world best practices & lessons learned from various NFPA standards to develop collaborative CRR initiatives with campus communities that are cost effective, inclusive, and sustainable.
 
Learning Objectives
1. Identify stakeholders from local campuses who can contribute to community risk reduction initiatives.
2. Describe effective communication and outreach strategies to engage diverse stakeholder groups from campuses who can contribute to community risk reduction initiatives.
3. Recognize standards communities can utilizes to effectively navigate the risk reduction mitigation continuum:
a. NFPA 1300 (Standard on Community Risk Assessment and Community Risk Reduction Plan Development)
b. NFPA 1600 (Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs)
c. NFPA 3000 (Standard on Active Shooter/Hostile Event Response (ASHER)

 

 
005. Fire wall and Fire Door enforcement - Are We Doing Enough to Protect Our Community and Fire Service Responders?
Presented by: Stonewall Safety & Fire Safety Consulting LLC
 
Building fires are among the most threatening life safety incidents. Look around our community at critical infrastructure such as Healthcare, Apartments, Senior Citizen Highrise, Strip Malls, and other commercial structures that are potential large loss of life buildings that requires enforcement of fire walls and fire doors. Are we actively enforcing the fire codes to protect our fire service responders and our community?

 
With buildings that include multiple occupancies there are many possibilities for a fire to start and potentially travel through an entire building, put occupants, and fire service personnel in danger. Fire separation and protection requirements of fire walls and fire doors are intended to delay the spread of fire and collapse of structural members allowing occupants time to exit the building. This also protects fire service personnel during rescue and from potential structural collapse and also assist in faster fire control within a structure.

 
The fire and building codes allow us to see that new buildings are constructed for protection and fire maintenance codes allow us to enforce upkeep of the buildings. Enforcement of NFPA 101 and NFPA 80 for annual inspection of fire doors and fire dampers are an important aspect of enforcement for the protection of building occupants and fire service personnel.

 
Learning objectives:
1. Background & Context of NFPA and IBC
2. Annual Inspection Requirements
3. Owner’s Responsibilities and AHJ’s Responsibilities to protect our community and fire service personnel
 

 
006. Enforcing NFPA 25: Deficiencies, Impairments, and Observations
Presented by: American Fire Sprinkler Association

 
Description: Join us for a seminar to learn about enforcing the requirements of NFPA 25. NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems is referenced by the model fire codes. While NFPA 25 provides the required tasks and frequencies to perform ITM activities, enforcement lies within the fire code. This seminar will describe the differences in scope between the codes and standard and how consistent enforcement will benefit the fire safety for all.

 
Learning Objectives:
1. Identify the scope of NFPA 1 and NFPA 25
2. Determine the roles and responsibilities of the owner, the AHJ, and the ITM contractor
3. Identify a deficiency and impairment and the proper action for each
4. Identify tagging procedures to ensure compliance
 
 
007. Updates to NFPA 13, 2022 Edition: Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems
Presented by: American Fire Sprinkler Association

 
The installation standards for sprinkler systems and fire pumps have completed their latest revision cycle and are published under the 2022 editions. The standard for standpipe and hose systems is currently undergoing a major rewrite and reorganization and will be published under the 2023 edition. This presentation will review the significant changes in each document and their impact on the design of fire protection systems.

 
Learning Objectives:
1. Identify the requirements for single point density and apply for occupancy hazard approach and CMDA storage
2. Identify and apply new ESFR installation rules
3. Rank the hazard of commodity classification
4. Apply the friction loss of listed fittings correctly when performing hydraulic calculations
5. Select and size diesel fuel tanks
6. Determine the friction loss through a hose valve
 
 
011. Does Fire Prevention and Community Risk Reduction Matter in Your Organization?
Presented by: Lenexa Fire Department (Kansas)

 
Since the first fire department started the fire service has always been a reactionary service. We continuously prepare for the worse case scenarios because bad things happen. But what if we challenged the norm and become proactive over reactive? Is your organization proactive? Hear a proactive approach to community risk assessment which has led to a community’s fire risk reduction. Hear how a Fire Department’s fire problem has been changed to create a positive impact for the entire community. See how this behavioral change can impact the health and safety of the members of your community and your organization. Become the change agent for your community.
 
This one-hour lecture will provide a brief history of US Fire Service known complacency problem. Followed by a walk-through of the duplicable steps taken by the Lenexa Fire Department to significantly reduce a serious fire problem in the City of Lenexa Kansas over the course of several years, Through Emergency Response, Engineering, Education, Economic Incentives, Enforcement and Everyone getting involved together we can make a difference.
 
Learning Objectives:
1. Upon completion, participants will be able to describe key prevention points of the America Burning, America Burning Revisited and America Burning Recommissioned reports.
2. Upon completion, participants will be able to explain the process to determine a Community Risk Reduction need for a fire problem.
3. Upon completion, participants will be able identify the stakeholders who play a part in making the behavioral change happen.
 
 
012. Large Construction Site Fire Case Study. Is Your Jurisdiction Prepared?
Presented by: City of West Des Moines Fire Department (Iowa)
 
According to a February 2020 report issued by the NFPA, local fire departments responded to an estimated average of 3,840 fires in structures under construction and 2,580 fires in structures under major renovation per year in 2013 through 2017. The fires in structures under construction caused an average of four civilian deaths, 49 civilian injuries, and $304 million in direct property damage annually.

 
This session will provide an in-depth case study on a large construction site fire that occurred in West Des Moines, Iowa in April 2020. We will discuss how fire safety requirements from Chapter 33 of the International Fire Code helped prepare the site, provide details of events that led up to the fire and numerous challenges encountered during the incident. In-depth details of lessons learned, how workers failed with their emergency plan, the economic impact of the loss, and new policies implemented within the jurisdiction as a result of the fire will be discussed. The West Des Moines Fire Department was able to obtain over 25 minutes of drone footage during the fire that will be shown to help highlight the magnitude of the event.

 
Learning Objectives:
1. Examples will be provided on how increased attention and monitoring of construction sites by Fire Prevention Bureau Staff, and construction pre plans routinely updated by fire crews within the response district are critical with construction projects in your jurisdiction.
2. Show the importance of visiting construction sites after major weather events to see how they might have been affected.
3. Discussion on how new policies that were implemented in West Des Moines, Iowa as a direct result of this fire may be used in your jurisdiction to help prevent or reduce damage caused by a construction site fire.
 
 
014. Carbon Monoxide Alarm and Detection Requirements IBC/NFPA 720
Presented by: D. Szorentini Associates

 
There is confusion industry wide regarding what is a Carbon Monoxide (CO) Alarm and what is a CO Detector and how these devices differ in the International Building Code (IBC).
The IBC specifically defines when CO alarms are required, and CO detection is optional. When the detection option is utilized, many do not realize that all of NFPA 720 now applies except for location of devices. This can be a costly error creating turmoil in an occupancy for the Owner, Designer and Contractor.

 
Learning Objectives:
1. Properties of CO
2. UL2034 VS UL2075
3. What is a CO Alarm?|
4. What is a CO Detection System?
5. Required Locations of CO Alarms/Detectors
6. Requirements in IBC Chapter 9 Section 915
7. Requirements of NFPA 720
 

 
016. Datacenters - Is Your Data FIRE Safe?
Presented by: ST Telemedia Global Data Centres

 
With the technological advancement where the world is moving towards performance-based economy, human dependency on automated systems has increased exponentially in the last couple of decades. This growing technological advancement is directly proportional to the data we are generating in every day or rather every second in unprecedented amount irrespective of whether it is coming from corporations or social media or personal data.

 
The importance of data storage, with advancement in technologies such as IOT, BIG DATA and Cloud, have never been as important as human life. Today the big question is whether this data is safe? Are our DATA CENTRES are protected with the required Fire Alarm system/Fire protection system/Fire suppression system?

 
With a sudden increase in the amount of DATA, it is evident that the number of datacenters is going to increase. Are we creating Fire Safe datacenters? What kind of Fire products are getting used in protecting our data from FIRE? Are these fire products are meeting the expectations of the codes and standards which we have laid down keeping property safety aspect?

 
Over last decade, DATA CENTERS has witnessed growth in emerging markets globally. These emerging markets have been influenced by the western peer groups and will continue to follow the various aspects such as codes, Standards, Designing and Technology. With continued challenges in the emerging economies such as lack of regulation on Codes and Standards, fire safety awareness etc. it is important to bridge the gap with knowledge and skills in the field of consulting. Let’s look at “Property Protection - Datacenters”.

 
Learning Objectives:
1. Datacenters – Fire Detection/Protection/Suppression Design methodologies – NFPA 75 & 76
2. Risks & Challenges
3. Can we have a double win?
 
 
017. Fundamentals of Fire Pump Plan Review
Presented by: American Fire Sprinkler Association

 
While there is an ample amount of information available on what to include on working plans for sprinkler systems, the details necessary for a successful fire pump plan review are often overlooked. This seminar will discuss the specific items needed on fire pump plans as required by NFPA 20 and include some common errors. These items will be examined through the perspective of providing a reasonable degree of protection and promote cooperation between the AHJ and contractor.

 
Learning Objectives:
1. Identify the items required to be included to the fire pump plans
2. Identify issues with installation including devices in suction pipe, changes in direction, sensing line locations, pressure reducing valves, etc..
3. Verify size of diesel fuel tanks
 
 
018. “Hot Work Robot” - Portable Fire Watch System
Presented by: Fike

 

Due to high losses in hot work-related fires, FM Global and the Fike Corporation jointly developed a portable fire watch system [Hot Work Robot] to supplement or substitute personnel during and after the hot work has been completed.

 
FM Global and Fike collaborated on FM Standard 3270 "Examination Standard for Hot work Robots" for detection/annunciation specifications, evaluation and testing of detection and annunciation equipment used to monitor for fire during and after hot work activities.

 
This “Hot Work Robot” - Portable Fire Watch System will contribute to personnel safety by removing the human element from potentially dangerous environments, i.e. nuclear and industrial/petrochemical plants as well as provide higher reliability of detection with fixed, approved detection and allow significant cost savings.

 
The requirement includes FM approved flame detectors that include embedded HD video cameras as well as video analytics smoke detection. Live video and alarms are sent to a manned location. The equipment can also provide monitoring of areas where fire suppression and detection systems are offline due to maintenance or construction.
  

 
020. Understanding the Residential Mid-Rise Fire Problem from a Fire Protection and Code Enforcement Perspective
Presented by: The National Fire Sprinkler Association

 
Join me for a tail board talk on the residential fire problem in mid-rise apartment buildings. We are experiencing large apartment fires every day in the United States and continue to misunderstand how to use the fire protection design to our advantage. This program will discuss the design criteria for buildings designed with combined systems, meeting the requirements of 13R Standard for the Installation of Fire Sprinkler Systems and NFPA 14 Standard for the Installation of Standpipes and Hose Systems, in Low-Rise Residential Occupancies and how we can use them to our tactical advantage. It will also cover the challenges and misnomers commonly associated with this design.
 
Learning Objectives:
1. Examples and expectations of the 13R design
2. Understanding combined water-base fire protection design
3. Identifying and utilizing NFPA 13R sprinkler systems to your tactical advantage
4. Understanding the commonly misunderstood NFPA 13R design
 
 
022. Wooden I-joist Construction and Firefighter Safety
Presented by: American Wood Council

 
This program identifies the features and benefits of wood I-joists which explains the prevalence in the market. The program also explains UL fire testing that identified the fire performance failures or light frame floor assemblies which led to changes in the floor protection requirements of the International Residential Code® (IRC). Those IRC protection requirements are explained. Alternate methods of protecting I-joist assemblies are explained along with the details of acceptable installation of specific assemblies. This program will discuss changes in housing stock and interior contents, and changes in building materials that have posed a challenge for firefighters.

 
Learning Objectives:
1. Review wood I-joist and its application in residential construction
2. Identify wood I-joist fire protective assemblies and IRC requirements
3. Explain UL fire testing that identified the fire performance failures which led to changes in the floor protection requirements of the IRC
4. Discuss changes in housing stock and interior contents, and changes in building materials that have posed a challenge for firefighters
 

 
023. Tall Mass Timber Buildings (construction) & Fire Service Concerns
Presented by: American Wood Council

 
This Course introduces firefighters and fire inspectors to tall mass timber (TMT) buildings (that can be constructed up to 18 stories in some cases), the history of cross laminated timber (CLT), how it is made and its properties. The Course outlines the new code requirements in the International Building Code (IBC) and discusses the extensive fire testing that was conducted. The program addresses specific fire service concerns
 
 
024. Helping Your Fire Investigator: What NOT to do After a Fire
Presented by: Meridian Fire Department (Idaho)
 
This session is for new firefighters or seasoned leaders. It is to remind crews how you as a firefighter can help your fire investigator. Many fire investigations have been made harder or even ruined by crews doing excess damage after a fire. We will cover some of the basics needed for a successful fire investigation.

 
Some of the topics discussed:
A. When is the fire “out”
B. Why do I need to leave the sheetrock on the walls
C. What to do if you find a body
D. How you too can become a fire investigator

 
Learning Objectives:
1. Why actions prior to the investigator arrive are important
2. What to do if you find a body(ies) in the fire scene
3. How to start the journey to become a fire investigator.
 
 
025. Fire Codes "How Did We Get Here" 'Those Who Fail to Learn from History are Often Condemned to Repeat It!
Presented by: Western Reserve Joint Fire District (Ohio)

 
In a 1948 speech to the House of Commons, Churchill paraphrased Santayana when he said, 'Those who fail to learn from history are condemned to repeat it.’ The purpose of this presentation is to prevent that from happening.

 
Often times, we as inspectors get so overwhelmed in the wording of the code, writing our violations, and following up, we lose that personal touch with our community. I have found it much easier to have that difficult conversation at the end of an inspection when issuing a correction notice to give an example of why it is important the inspectors visit for the annual inspection, and the violations be corrected.

 
Simply telling a business owner that they need to clear out the storage under the stairs sometimes goes in one ear and out the other. If you tell them it needs cleared out, and the fire code says so because there was a fire where multiple children lost their lives in part because of improper storage, it may drive your point home. The same with locking exits while occupied. Why is it important that we have our exits unlocked while the business is occupied? This conversation often falls on deaf ears, the exit is unlocked while we are inspecting, and re-locked the second we leave.
Being able to explain why and give examples of historic fires, may help to get the point across. Learning where we came from not only will prevent history from repeating itself but help us steer our future in the right direction.

 
Learning objectives:
1. For every rule there is a name- what changes to the fire code have resulted from the historic fires that will be reviewed
2. What do we get out of code enforcement- knowing the answer to this question and how to respond when it is asked when you are out in the community makes the tough conversations a bit easier
3. Historic fires- a review of 15 historic fires, fixable code violations that could have changed the outcome of the fire, and the changes that came about as a result of the fire
 
 
026. Fire Service Concerns and Automated Parking Systems/Structures
Presented by: Cambridge Fire Department (Massachusetts)

 
Vehicular parking has had a long-time history with having issues. The major issue is the real estate needed to accommodate the parking needs. Problem solving of these issues, in earlier times displayed some ingenious creativity that certainly looking back on them now, appears to show them to be rather simplistic. This simplicity typically came with an added layer of having the systems being operated under someone’s care who was very knowledgeable of the operation and could intervene should the need arise.

 

Today’s issues are more advanced and highly technical. Modern systems come with overseas design ideology, a desire for complete hands-off automation, and inherency to argue hardship as a driver for necessity. Of course, these systems strive for safety, however, it is possible that our model codes and standards are not in place or may not be in line or caught up to this industry. Additional discussion from this presentation is needed to get the awareness out to address today’s firefighting concerns.

 
Learning Objectives:
1. Identify the tools needed to assist the fire service interactions with these systems
2. Recognize the regulatory overlaps in this industry
3. Recognize the regulatory gaps in this industry.
  
 
030. Significant Changes to the 2022 Edition of the NFPA 72® National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code
Presented by: Honeywell Fire Safety

 
An informative and unbiased presentation covering key changes to the 2022 edition of the NFPA 72® National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code as well as providing the reasons for the changes and how they will impact public life safety.

 
Learning Objectives:
1. The new requirements for batteries
2. Abandoned fire alarm equipment
3. Carbon monoxide detection
4. Low frequency audible alarm signal
5. Remote access to systems
6. Wireless pathways
7. Supervising stations.
 
 
031. Past, Current and Future of the Fire Alarm Transmission Ecosystem
Presented by: Honeywell Fire Safety

 
An informative presentation that provides an overview of the Alarm Transmission Ecosystem as well as providing information as to why changes are being made that will enhance public life safety. This discussion is important because the technologies for transmitting alarm, trouble, and supervisory signals from the protected premises to the fire department is changing rapidly. Several of the legacy technologies are becoming or are obsolete.

 
Presentation Agenda:
1. History of U.S. Alarm Transmission EcoSystem
2. Issues with Legacy Alarm Transmission Technologies (3G Sunset and FCC Mandate for POTS) 3. Alarm Transmission Requirements in the 2022 edition of NFPA 72®
 
 
032. Remote Inspections and Testing – How NFPA 915 Will Change the Way You See Things
Presented by: Potter Electric Signal Company, LLC
 

NFPA 915 began is life just a few short years ago as a standard developed around “Remote Video Inspection”. But even before it’s publication, its grown into a standard that provides a framework around not only remote inspections, but also automated testing. As its currently written, NFPA 915 addresses many of the considerations needed to implement and manage remote inspection and testing in today’s rapidly changing world. In this presentation participants will learn about the history behind NFPA 915, its current status, and how to put the concepts addressed in NFPA 915 to work.
 
Learning Objectives:
1. Recall the conditions that prompted the development of NFPA 915.
2.  Understand the scope and application of the standard.
3. Put into practice the concepts covered by NFPA 915.
 
 
033. Modern Considerations for Responding Firefighters involving Storage Warehouse Fires and Installed Fire Protection and Life-Safety Systems
Presented by: National Fire Sprinkler Association

 
This seminar will provide attendees with the latest information and critical information from lessons learned in recent warehouse fires specifically for both company officers and responding firefighters. This includes the following: understanding the difference between public vs. private fire hydrants to support the fire department connection (FDC), evaluating the difference between “supply” vs. “supplemental” water to the fire protection system, understanding the different available pressures for standpipe hose connections, in contrast to hose connections used for fire sprinkler systems, reviewing the proper sequence of introducing mechanical smoke removal systems in gaining control of the fire during the critical stage and final extinguishment of the fire and the ventilation of the building, understanding the limitations of thermal-imaging cameras (TIC) in “cold smoke” conditions in large warehouse fires.
 
 
034. Fire Sprinkler Considerations for Tall Clear Height Warehousing / ESFR Fire Sprinkler Protection in Warehouses
Presented by: Harrington Group Inc - Fire Protection Engineers
 

The growth of warehousing has dramatically accelerated across the United States, particularly driven by the supply chain shortfalls and disruptions as a result of COVID-19. As the demand for warehousing grows, the industry is also faced with the fact that land suitable for a large-footprint warehouse development is getting more difficult to find. Therefore, the new warehousing being built is growing taller to provide more storage space within; however, that expansion poses additional considerations on operations, structure, and, importantly, fire protection.

 

The “Early Suppression Fast Response” or “ESFR” sprinkler was developed decades ago to provide adequate protection to racked and stacked commodities from only the ceiling sprinkler system, providing options to eliminate in-rack automatic sprinklers. However, as warehouse heights increase, they are quickly outpacing the prescriptive options available within NFPA 13, pushing users, engineers, and AHJ’s to understand and utilize new technologies and testing data. This presentation will discuss some fire sprinkler considerations for warehouses with tall clear heights, review standard commodities used as basis for the suppression testing, and identify some specific-application sprinklers which can be utilized for these taller warehouse structures
 
 
035. The 5 Specialty Sprinkler Types and (Sprinkler) Design Approaches
Presented by: Viking Fire Sprinklers
 

Fire sprinkler systems save lives. When a fire occurs, standard spray sprinklers control the blaze by cooling and wetting surfaces to deprive it of fuel sources and prevent the fires spread and movement. Some sprinkler types in specific systems take this further—they’re designed to completely suppress the fire in more challenging environments like storage facilities and institutions, etc.. How fire sprinkler systems are designed using specialty sprinklers can sometimes be a complicated process.

 
Learning Objectives
1. Gain knowledge of the advantages of using attic sprinklers over standard spray sprinkler designs
2. Discuss the challenges of combustible interstitial space fires and how to provide protection
3. Understand the necessity and importance of using institutional and other specialty sprinklers
4. Describe how using window sprinklers allows for architectural freedom in building design
 
 
036. A Constant State of Readiness: Swinging Fire Doors Have One Job!
Presented by: Door Safety LLC

 
Swinging fire doors have one job, preventing a fire from spreading. For this reason, swinging fire doors must be kept in a state of constant readiness. Self-closing fire doors sometimes become obstacles to us as we move through buildings, and we make the doors work the way we want them to, not realizing they cannot perform their one job. Door safety inspections of fire doors ensures the doors are ready and able to do their one job. Got fire doors? This presentation will discuss the in-and-outs of keeping fire doors in a constant state of readiness and code compliance.
 

 
037. Balancing Life Safety and Security While Maintaining a User-Friendly Facility
Presented by: The Indiana/Kentucky/Ohio Regional Council of Carpenters

 
When it matters most, it already must be working. Have you ever tried to open a door that was hard to open or would not open? Perhaps the door would not close completely. The last thing that any facility owner wants is a tragedy to occur that was preventable by regular inspections and maintenance. The requirements for doors that are either fire-rated or exit doors is described in the Fire & Life Safety and Building Codes. The code language can be confusing and conflicting. This course will cover the requirements for fire-rated and exit doors as well as what you can do to keep your fire-rated and exit doors code compliant and user-friendly.

 
Learning Objectives:
1. Identify the requirements for fire-rated openings and exits
2. Identify the most common deficiencies that cause an opening to be out of compliance
3. Recognize the openings in your facility that must be inspected and maintained
4. Justify an inspection and maintenance schedule for your fire-rated and egress openings
  

 
040. Leveraging New Technologies in the Fire and Life Safety Industry
Presented by: Keltron Corporation

 
Program Description Pending Approval
 
 
041. Commercial Cooking and Emerging Exhaust System Technology - Smoke Control
Presented by: International Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning Association

 

This innovative technology is changing the way restaurants and other food service businesses operate. Commercial kitchen ventilation removes the heat and effluent generated by the cooking process from the kitchen space, ensuring the comfort and safety of the cooking staff and preventing cooking odors from spreading beyond the kitchen. Commercial kitchen ventilation is composed of an average of two hoods suspended above the cooking appliances, and ducting and fans necessary to expel the heat and effluent outside. To replace the air lost through this process, make-up air (MUA) must be provided by the building’s heating ventilation and HVAC system or a MUA system dedicated to the kitchen, which is composed of its own fans, ducts, and potentially heating or cooling depending on the climate.

 

We will discuss new technology and updates to codes and standards for fire code officials.

 
 
042. The Compliance Engine
Presented by: Brycer

 

Across the nation, 40% of Fire Protection Systems go un-tested, un-inspected, and un-maintained year over year. Less than 3% of Fire Code Officials nationwide can tell you when a Commercial Properties Sprinkler was last inspected or even if it is Compliant or Deficient. 95% of Fire Departments do not have the time, manpower, or resources to inspect each of their properties on an Annual basis. How is this changing...? Departments are implementing Software as a Service models to combat these drastic numbers and tackle the 3rd party inspection reporting industry.
 

 
043. Special Amusement Buildings - Haunted Attractions and Escape Rooms Should Scare You
Presented by: Cardinal Joint Fire District

 
Halloween has become a $10 billion- dollar-a-year industry and is second only to the Christmas holiday. From mazes and hayrides to temporary haunts, permanent haunts, charity and home haunted attractions, there are well over 5000 haunted attractions in the US. With the addition of “escape rooms” that number has climbed to 7500 attractions. Haunted attractions lead customers into a labyrinth of mazes with lights, sounds and low visibility that, if not properly inspected, could lead to a tragedy. In this class, we will review the applicable fire codes that regulate haunted attractions and escape rooms; tips on conducting the inspections; and the requirements needed to open one. This class will not only give you the perspective of the fire inspector, but also that of a haunted attraction builder and manager.

 
The following information will be covered in this class:
Intro and History, Haunted Attraction Statistics, What is Considered a “Haunted Attraction” or “Escape Room”, Types of Attractions, History of Haunted Attraction Fires, What Codes do Haunted Attractions and Escape Rooms Fall Under, Haunted Attraction Association and CHAOS, Pre-season walk-thru, Your Expectations and Requirements, Submitting Floor Plan, Applying for Permits, Fire & Life Safety, Sprinkler & Fire Alarm System, Public Address System, Fire Extinguishers.
 
 
044. Inspecting the Commercial Kitchen Exhaust - Water Wash Hood Systems and the Proper Inspection process
Presented by: International Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning Association

 

How well do you understand commercial kitchen exhaust, water wash, and fire suppression jargon? This session is for design engineers, building inspectors, fire prevention officers, restaurant and property managers, maintenance workers and insurance companies.

 
The exhaust system is an integral part of ensuring the safety of all commercial cooking operations. The exhaust system is intended to remove grease laden vapors, steam, heated air, and other products of combustion to a safe location outdoors. In order for the exhaust system to operate properly, and to ensure the fire suppression system has the ability to function as designed, the exhaust system must be routinely inspected, cleaned, serviced, and maintained by a qualified vendor.

 
Owners, landlords, and tenants are responsible for ensuring that the routine maintenance, service, and cleaning of the exhaust system has been performed to ensure that the system is in proper working order and that you are in compliance with the code. The responsibility to maintain these systems is typically inherited by the tenant unless the responsibility is specifically assumed by another party through a contract, lease, or other agreement.

 

This session will give you an overview of the code required process.

 

 
045. Understanding the Fire Investigation Process for Firefighters, Company Officers and Fire Inspectors.
Presented by: The Fire Code Academy

  

This presentation will provide initial fire investigation awareness to firefighters and code officials. At this basic level, we will prepare firefighters and first responders with the knowledge needed to initially operate at a fire scene taking into consideration the investigation needs that may follow extinguishment prior to overhaul.

 
We will review key information on many different investigative aspects. Additionally, we will discuss why critical thinking is important to protecting the scene and aiding in the fire investigation process. All firefighters, company officers and first responders have an obligation to preserve the fire scene (to the best of their ability) for the investigation team.
 

 

046. NFPA 72 – Chapter 14: Testing and Inspection [Can You Self-Perform Them]
For Code Officials and Building Owners - An insight into NFPA 72 [National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code®] Chapter 14 - Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance Requirements

Presented by UL Solutions

This presentation will include an overview of the test and inspection requirements as defined by NFPA 72, The National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code. This program will also stress the definitions of qualified personnel and a few of the avenues to obtain these qualifications.

 

In additional to recent updates, this program will define the roles of the person conducting, inspection, testing, programming and servicing of the fire alarm system as well as review the documentation requirements for both the personnel and the test and inspection activities.
 

 

047. NFPA 72  – Chapter 26: Supervising Station Alarm Systems [Understanding the UL Monitoring Systems Certification Program]

For Code Officials and Building Owners - An insight into NFPA 72 [National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code®] Chapter 26 - Supervising Station Alarm Systems.

Presented by: UL Solutions

 
Fire officials verify that fire alarm systems are installed per applicable code requirements. However, once these systems are installed it is a challenge for many jurisdictions to ensure they continue to comply with code requirements.

 
The UL fire alarm certificate program is designed to make sure that systems will continue to be tested and maintained after their initial system acceptance, and at no additional cost to the jurisdiction.
Fire codes require some fire alarm systems to be monitored by an approved supervising station in accordance with NFPA 72, and fire officials often require these systems to be monitored by a UL Listed facility which is consistent with NFPA 72. However, merely requiring the fire alarms systems to be monitored by a listed facility does not mean the central station will provide all of the NFPA 72 required elements for central station service.
  

048. Using Black and White Codes in a World of Grey
Presented by: Protection Engineers, LLC (PELLC) 

 

Program Description Pending Approval

 

 

049. Myth Busters - 2023 Fire Protection Edition
Presented by: Protection Engineers, LLC (PELLC) 

  

In this presentation we will discuss and bust various myths surrounding common fire protection issues. This 2023 program expands on a variety topics and tackles some other myths and misconceptions surrounding fire protection issues. For example, what does it mean to “void a UL listing? Does the ADA require the installation of fire alarm strobes? The codes are all based on technically substantiated science. Come and learn of some of these fire protection myths and misconceptions and see them busted so you can more effectively understand and apply fire and life codes and standards.

 

 

050. NFPA 80 & 105 - Code Requirements and Assessment for Meeting Inspection, Documentation, and Decommissioning Compliance of Fire & Smoke Doors and Dampers.

Presented by: Life Safety Enterprises

 

This session will discuss the requirements for meeting the NFPA 80 & 105 Standards for Opening Protectives as referenced by most fire codes. We will review the inspection criteria used to address the standards as they relate to the inspection, remediation and maintenance of smoke and fire rated doors and dampers. It is important to understand the code requirements for these doors and what these doors are intended to do to keep people safe.

We will review the importance of properly identifying rated barriers (Fire Barrier / Smoke Barrier / Smoke Partition) and the different standards for each, as well as how to address decommissioning of doors that are not needed. We will also review "Best Practice" Documentation and how to track deficiencies and repairs.

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     Conference Lunch Menues
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Monday

 

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 Tuesday

 

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Campus Fire Safety Com LLC and The Fire Code Academy
Life Safety Forum Conference Team
81 Mill Street - Suite 300

Gahanna, Ohio  43230 
 
Office: 614-416-8077

 

 

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